Return address: 4 ways to step up your wedding envelope game

Your wedding invitations are ready to be sent and soon your guests will get their first glimpse into your big day. But before you put them (the invites, not the guests) in the mailbox, have you thought of listing a return address at the back of your main envelope?



I know, it doesn't sound like a big deal and it is a detail often forgotten or overlooked. But I always encourage my couples to have the return address either printed or handwritten on the back-flap of their wedding envelopes. Now, I am not big on etiquette and I believe that your celebration can only be special if it is truly a reflection of you. And that includes your wedding stationery and the wording you use. So there'll be no nonsense from me but only two reasons for writing the return address: one practical and one purely aesthetic because I'm all about making your paper goods look exciting.



Why it is a good idea

The main purpose of a return address on the back of your wedding envelopes is that in the unfortunate event your mail doesn’t get delivered to the intended recipient, it can then be returned to you. No more wondering if all your guests did get their invite or not, if nothing comes back to you, you’re good!


What address you should use

In order to keep track of the number of guests attending your wedding, it is a good idea to have one person in charge of collecting all the RSVP cards. And that person’s address should be the one written on the front of your response card envelopes as well as on the back of your main envelopes. This responsibility could fall on the couple themselves, one of the spouses to be – separately-, the parents of the nearlyweds, the Mate of Honour, etc. Just make sure first that whoever it is is on board and double check you’ve got their details right!


Pretty post

Now, you’re convinced of the usefulness of a return address, let’s see at how pretty we can make it look. Yes, you could just have it printed on the back flap, but come on, let’s take it up a notch here, I’m a calligrapher after all. So let's say you have opted for calligraphy addressing and that you have thrown to the wind tradition - I'm talking about the one where you're not supposed to write both your names at the back (no one will be shocked, most couples live together before they get married nowadays, let’s not pretend otherwise). I have come up with four different ways of writing the return address on a diamond back flap envelope, playing with calligraphy, hand lettered font, layout and even a monogram. Anything but a boring envelope!



Calligraphy all the way


Bold modern calligraphy for the names and for the address. The writing is covering most of the diamond flap, simple but efficient in style. Note that the postcode isn’t in calligraphy to avoid any misreading from the post office and your invitation to be lost.



Mix it up


I love mixing calligraphy and simple hand lettered font (otherwise known as “normal” handwriting). This layout is more central, covering the bottom half of the back flap, with only the names of the nearlyweds written in calligraphy.



Slanted


Now, taking the same elements as above, I have added a little twist by changing the layout and writing it all diagonally and on three lines only. I do like how playful this one is.



Monogrammed


Last but not least, why not have your initials in a monogram instead of your full name? It definitely adds a je ne sais quoi to it all! The address is then again, a mix of calligraphy and hand lettered typography.



There you have it, some ideas to make the back of your wedding invitations envelopes looking a little bit more alive! You could also go for a mix of printed and calligraphy; anything is possible really, just ask your stationery designer - that would be me.


Head over to my IGTV to watch me write these four different styles, I've been told it is very soothing.


And for more tips and inspiration on how to make your wedding stationery truly yours, have a look at my Customisation Guide for your Stationery Design. And any questions, just ask.